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Wednesday
Aug242011

Editor's Box | Digest: Articles 83 through 92

June 17 through August 19. Catch up on any of the articles you've missed!


June 17, 2011
“Do You Think the World Will End in Your Lifetime? Part 2” by Judah Synnestvedt.
In part two (part one may be found here) Judah looks at the bible for evidence of the resurrection being either an absolutely material event, as Millennialists would have it, or a spiritual reality apart from time and space. Judah finds confirmation of the latter, supported by Swedenborg's vision of a concrete spiritual world.

June 24, 2011
“Love Letters” by Donnette Alfelt.
Donnette shares two letters sent between her parents, Donald and Marjorie Rose, nearly 100 years ago, as they were enduring a summer apart before being married. She draws comfort from how they envisioned their separation, and takes these lessons to heart in her own widowhood.

July 1, 2011
“Homosexuality” by Coleman Glenn.
This is the opening essay in our series on homosexuality. Here Coleman elaborates on his position that homosexual attraction is disorderly. By voicing that conclusion, he feels he can offer people who experience same sex attraction the opportunity to disconnect from that inclination with integrity and pursue a higher path.

July 8, 2011
“The Pro-Love Agenda” by Dylan Hendricks.
Dylan's argument for the equal rights of homosexual people stands on the back of the greatest commandment, to love the Lord above all, and the neighbor as oneself. In a world of nuance and division, this message simplifies the terrain and encourages us to enlarge our concept of the human family. This is the second essay in our series on homosexuality.

July 15, 2011
“Creation” by Lawson Smith.
The third piece in our series on homosexuality is contributed by Lawson Smith. Rather than speaking out against homosexuality directly, Lawson focuses on the creation story and what it means to be created in the image of God, male and female. He draws passages together that suggest that the highest use we can perform in this world would be to raise children who can come to know the Lord and serve Him.

July 22, 2011
“View of Homosexuality: Doctrine or Bias” by Dylan Glenn.
Dylan draws a distinction between what the Writings actually say about homosexuality, and what we may decide the Writings say about it based on our own cultural bias. He feels that doctrine and life experience must share common ground, or the validity of each should be questioned.

July 29, 2011
“Love Your Neighbor (yep, even those different than you)” by Michelle Chapin.
Rather than argue her perspective with quotes from scripture, Michelle urges people to listen deeply to each other and maintain a humble and open mind when discussing homosexuality. While certainty remains out of reach, mutual love and respect must inform the search for it. This is the final entry in our July series on homosexuality.

August 5, 2011
“Lessons from Milankovitch, Swedenborg, and Cold, Obnoxious Winters” by Lauren Anderson.
After months of dull and overcast weather, Lauren is driven to perform an interpretive dance representing the orbit of the earth around the sun. She compares the seasons to the changes of state we undergo in relation to our center of love and wisdom (the Lord). We could even weary of ecstasy if it were allowed to linger too long.

August 12, 2011
“Dreams” by Helen Kennedy.
Helen traces the progression of how humans have interpreted dreams from Biblical times through to the present day. She examines why we are removed from perceiving their significance directly.

August 19, 2011
“And When He Came to Himself” by Isaac Synnestvedt.
Isaac gives testimony to the inner reaches of his spirit. Laying self satisfaction aside, he witnesses the Lord in battle against the evil within him and vows to remain vigilant until His victory is sure.

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